The Saint Galvao Prayer Pills. What will the Catholic Church think of next?

Is there anything that the Catholic Church won’t put on the table that devout Catholics won’t eat up?

Introducing the St. Galvao Prayer Pill for the Catholic who still believes that praying to God through Christ alone just isn’t good enough (in spite of the Bible’s clear teaching that Jesus is the ONLY mediator between God and man).

I wonder how the Mary worshipers devotees will take this since they still cling to the heretical couplet that “Mary, the Mother of Jesus, is the gateway of God“.

Seriously, these “prayer pills” sound like something that TBN would be selling. I thought the RCC had a little more respectability than to do something like this . . . yes, I know, there was that Indulgences thing. But to quote a famous Mormon defense, “That was in the past, we don’t teach that anymore.” No siree. Now we have prayer pills!

I wait with anticipation for the next gimmick the Catholic Church will send down the pike.

14 thoughts on “The Saint Galvao Prayer Pills. What will the Catholic Church think of next?

  1. Yet again, people think they can buy God’s power & healing. Nothing different than these WOF preacher’s selling their prayer cloths & holy water.
    I’m reminded of Peter’s rebuke of Simon the Sorcerer when I read this & similar stories: Peter answered: “May your money perish with you, because you thought you could buy the gift of God with money! You have no part or share in this ministry, because your heart is not right before God. Repent of this wickedness and pray to the Lord. Perhaps he will forgive you for having such a thought in your heart. For I see that you are full of bitterness and captive to sin.” (Acts 8:20-23)

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  2. I wait with anticipation for the next gimmick the Catholic Church will send down the pike.

    Why wait on them.

    How about….”Pope on a Rope Bath Soap”? Wash the dirt off your body and the sins off your soul with “Pope on a Rope”. Infused with 98% faux grace for those extra dirty, yet purgatory-conscious, Romanists.

    Or….”The Eucharist Vending Machine”. Why wait till Sunday for false assurance of salvation? Now you can partake in the eucharist at your leisure. Insert your money (this is the most important step), select the regular, whole-grain, or fruit-flavored waifer, and the priestly voice recording will transubstantiate it right on the spot. Quick, easy, and fun for the Romanist on the go, even if they don’t know where they’re going.

    Or…”Evian Holy Water”. When your parched and thirsty after a morning jog don’t replenish your liquids with that non-papacy approved water of condemnation, drink Evian Holy Water. The only water bottled from rivers and lakes with saintly names. Yes, Evian spelled backwards is “naive”, but that’s just a coincidence.

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  3. Yeah, they’re original. I think I may have gotten the name “pope on a rope” from some comedian, but I can’t remember who. (hee hee)

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  4. I’m appalled at the discourse being directed at my faith in this section of the website. Much of the characterizations I’ve seen in this and other related threads are inventions of bigots born of irrational hatred, though I give at least most of the people here the benefit of the doubt on the side of genuine, if misguided, concern.

    I am by no means a priest (despite my grandma’s urging), but I have a solid understanding of my faith. The core and most essential beliefs of the Church are clearly stated below, in the Nicene Creed that we proclaim at least once a week:

    We believe in one God: the Father, the Almighty; maker of heaven and earth, of all that is seen and unseen.

    We believe in one Lord, Jesus Christ, the only Son of God, eternally begotten of the Father, God from God, light from light, true God from true God, begotten, not made,
    of one Being with the Father. Through him all things were made. For us men and for our salvation he came down from heaven. By the power of the Holy Spirit, he was born of the Virgin Mary and became man. For our sake he was crucified under Pontius Pilate. He suffered, died, and was buried.
    On the third day he rose again in fulfillment of the Scriptures.
    He ascended into heaven and is seated at the right hand of the Father.
    He will come again in glory to judge the living and the dead, and his kingdom will have no end.

    We believe in the Holy Spirit. The Lord, the giver of life, who proceeds from the Father and the Son. With the Father and the Son he is worshiped and glorified. He has spoken through the prophets.

    We believe in one Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church.
    We acknowledge one baptism for the forgiveness of sins.
    We look for the resurrection of the dead and the life of the world to come. (END)

    These core beliefs encompass ALL the essential elements of Catholicism. When you profess these beliefs, you profess the Catholic faith. Simple as that. I doubt anyone here would have any disagreement with much in it, with the exception perhaps of the 2nd and 3rd-to-last lines. Let me address those anticipated exceptions.

    1) We believe in one Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church.
    Granted, this is rather exclusive-sounding. When it was drafted something like 1600 years ago, the exclusivity was meant to apply essentially to non-Christians and heretics who differed from one of the beliefs enumerated above. I don’t know with any certainty what view the Pope and official doctrine takes on the subject, but when I profess my faith, I say it in that context. I view all Christian denominations as Apostolic since they proceed in some way from the original Catholic and Apostolic church, and I embrace all denominations as fully Christian and substantively Catholic who subscribe to the clauses of this creed.

    2) We acknowledge one baptism for the forgiveness of sins.
    Again, this could be interpreted exclusively. However, I acknowledge one baptism in the sense of Christian baptism at large.

    Now with respect to other beliefs and practices such as praying to saints, burying statues of St. Joseph, transsubstantiation (which is addressed elsewhere on the site and I believe is well supported by scripture), etc., these have grown out of various sources from tradition to scripture itself. While some select ones may be required for orthodoxy, none of them require compulsory adherence to guarantee salvation, nor an acceptable knowledge of the Father, Son, nor the Holy Spirit with respect to that salvation.

    I feel I must address the particular subject of intercessory prayer, since it is probably the most often-attacked aspect of Catholicism, and the criticisms are universally false. Let me say this once and for all: prayer to saints or to the Virgin Mary are NOT a way of WORSHIPPING these people. It is a request for prayers on your behalf to God. It’s no different than asking a friend to pray for your sick mother, except that our Church traditionally tends to regard those who have lived the holiest of lives as the most desireable intercessors.

    Sola Scriptura is an invention of Martin Luther. The idea that nothing not provided for in the Bible can be correct belief or practice is contrary to centuries of tradition, the lives of the Apostles, and the implication of the Lord himself, who gave Peter the power to bind in Heaven that which he binds on Earth. Any Catholic tradition which doesn’t outright contradict the Word may be justified on that basis, though even I personally have serious reservations about some practices such as annulment. I also think, for example, that “Pauline Privilidge” is incorrectly applied to non-Catholics instead of non-Christians. I mention these not to criticize my church, but rather to indicate that I will not blindly defend all things Catholic. Thus, if you wish to discuss anything particular with me, you can be assured that I’m personally sincere and that I either have or will consider the alternative fairly.

    I feel since I commented on this particular entry, I should say something about those pills. Frankly I don’t know what to say, though. I’ve never heard of them, and it seems as if they’re used by a very narrow segment even of Brazilian Catholics. The story from the link doesn’t really give enough detail to make any kind of comment on it from my perspective.

    I like most of what I’ve read on this website, but I’m very troubled at the treatment that my faith receives here. I hope that I may convince at least some of you to choose more appropriate targets for your righteous disapproval.

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  5. This is not a product being produced or sold by the Catholic Church. These issues, like burying the statue of St. Joseph, are not teachings of the RCC. They are the product of uninformed Catholics’ supersitions. If it is your intent to minister to Catholics and inform them of your truth, then be accurate. Where did you get your information that the RCC is selling this product to its believers? State facts, sources, be a person of integrity.

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  6. Dear Rose,

    Thank you for your comment. My integrity is of the utmost importance and I will not purposely post something I know to be inaccurate. I am not too proud to admit error if I make a mistake.

    However, in this case, if you read the associated article, these pills were being handed out by nuns at a Catholic Church. As of yet, I have not seen where the RCC has denounced this practice. And in reference to the statue gimmick, if you read that carefully I never said that the RCC itself was promoting or endorsing it.

    If the RCC has in fact made a public proclamation against either of these items, please provide a link or source material for that. Otherwise, do not attempt to tarnish my integrity by implying something that’s not true in an attempt to defend the RCC. If these are unapproved actions by rouge Catholics, then I would at the very least expect you to denounce them.

    Thank you.

    – The Pilgrim.

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  7. Meg,

    There is no shame on me. I stated my post was original, and it is. The fact that someone else had the same ideas does not mean that I plagiarized them for my own credit, especially on someone else’s blog where I post using a pseudonym.

    As I stated above, the only thing that was not original was the phrase “pope on a rope” which I now think I heard from Robin Williams many years ago (Good Morning Vietnam maybe?).

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  8. “I feel I must address the particular subject of intercessory prayer, since it is probably the most often-attacked aspect of Catholicism, and the criticisms are universally false. Let me say this once and for all: prayer to saints or to the Virgin Mary are NOT a way of WORSHIPPING these people. It is a request for prayers on your behalf to God. It’s no different than asking a friend to pray for your sick mother, except that our Church traditionally tends to regard those who have lived the holiest of lives as the most desireable intercessors.”

    This was taken from Ross’s post. Now I just have a question. These people are dead in the sense that they are dead from this life. Correct? We will have glorified bodies such as Christ if I am not mistaken when we die from this body.

    It is different from asking a friend because you can see this friend, poke them, ect. You are praying to them when you are talking to the spiritual are you not? Is this not close to necromancy I think the word is. Whatever it is, communicating with the dead.

    Oh by the way, I was raised Roman Catholic, 10 years ok? Confirmed and everything and my saint was a man from Vietnam ( I’m half Vietnamese) named Andrew Dun-Lac. Point here…I learned more about saints, Mary, and rules that I should do to gain repentance and the such from purgatory than I did about Jesus Christ my Lord.

    I lived this stuff. I was miserable the whole time. I did everything they told me to do. It wasn’t until listen to a godly preacher called Paul Washer who wasn’t afraid to tell me the truth for once in my life.

    Granted, this may have just been my church in Minnesota.

    Oh, and why do we esteem man? We are nothing but a nose full of breath. We are who we are by the grace of God, and God is the only I AM. I don’t want to ask for the saint of “lost things” to help me find lost things, or the saint of “athletics” because I like sports. I want godly men and women who loved God.

    Praying….hmmm, the rosary, Hail Mary full of grace, she was the mother of God plain and simple, yes is she blessed among women, and everything, yes. But nonetheless she is a human being who was made by God and God should be praised for the creation of her.

    Anything I have said wrong, then tell me, I have no problem. Show me verses, but I have been raised in this so I can talk about it freely, others who were not raised cannot.

    I have learned more about Christ and God through biblical teaching ever since I left that particular church. Though it mattered more that I was truly saved only a couple months ago.

    Thank you, and if any of this sounds harsh, well it is because that is just how I talk. I’m not sorry. Again, if anything is amiss tell me, I will be back to check 🙂

    In Christ,
    Cassius

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  9. Sorry, it isn’t necromancy, that is communication with the dead, but it is something I just don’t know the name. I just thought of that, but it is something that is wrong. Major on that Christ is the only mediator to God, no one else. There shouldn’t be emphasis on any other human being except that they loved God so much to try to be like His Son. Humans are for advice and that is about it, and that could be hard to take, test all things, test what is said, has anyone actually questioned this practice that was made a thousand of years after the Apostles?

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