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A refreshing perspective from a Christian musician that gets it!

Of the many Christian artists in the world, there are some that actually understand their calling:

By the 2005 release of his third CD “White Flag,” based on his study and teaching of the Beatitudes, Shaun was questioning what his calling really was. He knew he was made for more than just entertaining audiences, and he was getting uneasy about his family’s comfortable lifestyle.

And because of that conviction, he does not charge admission for any of his performances (unlike some who charge up to $30 for a show). Recently he posted an article on his blog about a survey conducted among college chaplains that points out what we’ve been saying all along–that much of what is called “Christian” music these days is nothing more than sugar-coated pop-tunes filled with “Jesus is my boyfriend” platitudes [all emphases mine].

According to some college chaplains at this conference I’m at this week, long term exposure to Christian music may have unsavory side-effects.

They feel like they’re fighting bad theology and unbiblical perceptions created by the music business. Their students grew up listening to K-LOVE in the minivan on the way to school with mom. They grew up in “event-driven” churches singing songs from “stars” who also came to town to play concerts.

Did the industry change the church/students or did the church/students change the industry? Either way, these guys don’t think all change has been good.

Worship songs, these chaplains say, might be too important to college students. Singers are marketed (and sometimes, apparently, behaving like) nothing but saved rock stars. And don’t even get these chaplains started on lyrics!

These guys also say college students think involvement in a “worship gathering” is optional too – students can text or talk or sing or pray…whatever they want…like a concert. “This is what happens when communion with God becomes commercial,” one said.

“Why would I bring an artist to my campus for chapel and further propagate Christian celebrity and worship as concert?” another asked.

These guys are suspicious, at best, of the Christian music business and its artists. They say we don’t think enough about what we write and sing and how it will affect people exposed to it for years and years.

Couldn’t have said it better myself.

5 comments on “A refreshing perspective from a Christian musician that gets it!

  1. Reminds me Steve Camp’s realization of the same basic problem. As with all ministry efforts – we can get too enamored with what we see in the flesh and that will drag our attention off the Lord. Repent!

  2. Hey anyone remember Keith Green? He gave his albums away at one stage and you could give a donation towards it if you wanted to. Try catch a read of his story in the book written by his wife Melody; No Compromise. An inspiring and encouraging read.
    A true calling to serve with your talents and not compromising to the worlds standards is powerful way to glorify God.
    LoCTY (=Love of Christ To You)

  3. One of the last things I talked about with my pastor before stepping down as worship leader was placing the team behind the congregation eliminating not only the visual distraction but the performance mentality of which all are influenced to some degree. I did want to attract people through worship but was also somewhat horrified to think the focus of that worship might inadvertantly be misdirected to the instrument and not the “Author”.

  4. I’ve been a Christian musician for 37 years and have to agree on every point. Thank you for speaking the truth.

  5. I realize that I’m rather late to this party — but your thoughts are exactly what I’ve been thinking!

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