Derek meets a false apostle and Shelly confronts her pastor.

These two videos hit the proverbial nail on the head on every over-used cliche and every platitude I’ve hear ad nauseum in my time in charismatic circles. (You’ll have to watch each video over at YouTube since embedding has been enabled.)

Derek’s encounter:

Shelly’s encounter:

Quotes (842)

The work of the preacher resembles that of the sower. Like the sower, the preacher must sow good seed, if he wants to see fruit. He must sow the pure word of God, and not the traditions of the church, or the doctrines of men. Without this, his labor will be in vain. He may go to and fro, and seem to say much, and to work much in his weekly round of ministerial duty. But there will be no harvest of souls for heaven, no living results, and no conversions.

- J.C. Ryle

1816 – 1900

Jesus Our High Priest – Part 20 (Conclusion)

We are pleased to continue the Saturday Sermon Series again. This is the final (part 20) in a series of twenty messages from John 17. It was sovereignly delivered by Akash Sant Singh, who is one of the elders at Community Bible Church in Reno, Nevada. May it bring conviction to each of us as we realize our deep lack of prayer, which should be elemental to our Christian faith. Sadly, our prayer lives tend to reveal more about our self-sufficiency than of our utter dependency on the Saviour of our souls.

Jesus Our High Priest – Part 20

Sermon of the week: “You Must Attend” by Todd Musser.

Your sermon of the week is a gem by Todd Musser entitled You Must Attend.

This is a great message on the four figures found in Psalm 107: The wanderer, the prisoner, the fool, and the laborer.

Every single one of us falls into one of those four categories and Musser eloquently examines how God reaches each of these people, how each of them responds to God, and how each of them react to His offer of redemption, and all to God’s glory.

You’ll want to take notes on this one and you’ll never just breeze through Psalm 107 again.

Quotes (840)

Jim Elliot Consider the call of the Throne above, “Go ye,” and from round about, “Come over and help us,” and even the call from the damned souls below, “Send Lazarus to my brothers, that they come not to this place.”

Impelled, then, by these voices, I dare not stay home while Quichuas perish. So what if the well-fed church in the homeland needs stirring? They have the Scriptures, Moses, and the Prophets, and a whole lot more. Their condemnation is written on their bank books and in the dust on their Bible covers.

American believers have sold their lives to the service of Mammon, and God has His rightful way of dealing with those who succumb to the spirit of Laodicea.

- Jim Elliot

1927 – 1956

In conclusion: My final post on Christmas.

In this, my last post on the subject of Christmas, I wanted to share some final thoughts.

When I first posted my reasons for not celebrating Christmas (found here) I never imagined the furor it would cause. Although I was grateful to see much healthy dialogue on the subject, and equally grateful for those readers who are beginning to examine this matter for themselves, that gratefulness was eclipsed by how the discussion disintegrated into vitriolic arguments, including threats of violence (as seen in the comments section of this post on the origins of Christmas).

Watching the exchanges deteriorate as they did grieved me. I simply wanted to present my thoughts to the readers in the hopes that they too would begin to wrestle with the subject: Not to debate about whether or not we have liberty to celebrate the holiday, but “why as Christians do we celebrate it?”

It was certainly never my intent to cause discord or division among the saints. And because of that I want to apologize to those who witnessed the graceless exchange.

In my original post on Christmas I provided two primary reasons for choosing to no longer celebrate the holiday. I spent only 305 words mentioning the Romish and pagan origins of the holiday and 1,143 words (not counting the conclusion) discussing the other reason–namely the greed, covetousness, and the massive amount of money spent on ourselves while much of the world is starving for food, water, and the gospel. Unfortunately the overwhelming majority of the comments on DefCon over the past month has focused on the 305 words and not much was mentioned regarding the other 1,143 words. The latter reason, I feel, is just as important to consider as the former.

Where words fail in communicating a point sometimes images can help. For this reason I have chosen to share the following video as an illustration of why I have such a hard time with me–as a Christian–partaking in the festival of Christmas. How can I justify to myself, my children, my family, and ultimately God, that spending more money on vain material items under the guise of celebrating the birth of the One who gave up so much for us, is actually a good thing?

When I consider how the family in this video (one of countless families throughout the world) spends their Christmas–and every other day of the year–it makes a pile of needless presents sitting under a pretty tree seem rather pointless, selfish, and almost . . . sinful.

On this Christmas I want to introduce you to Sam, Esther, and Jane of Uganda:

It has been (and continues to be) my hope and prayer that we each examine our reasons for celebrating Christmas. It is also my hope and prayer that this issue will not divide us and that I will never develop a judgmental or better-than attitude toward those who choose to continue marking the holiday.

In conclusion I ask that you ponder with me this final thought: What would you and I prefer to be caught doing if the Lord came back during next year’s Christmas season?

1). Standing in a long line at Wal-Mart purchasing a large pile of soon-to-be-forgotten presents placing us further in debt in order to celebrate a holiday birthed from an unholy union between Rome and pagans celebrated by much of the unbelieving world in which–no matter how hard we try to avoid it–Jesus gets relegated to a sentimental byline–crowded out by the hectic activities, gluttonous parties, and greed of the season, all (supposedly) in honor of Jesus Christ’s incarnation?

2). Or would you and I prefer to be found using our time, money, and resources to help those like Sam, Esther, and Jane (not just at Christmas but all year long) by putting food and water in their bellies, a Bible in their hand, and a faithful missionary preacher in their midst?

You all know where I stand on the issue . . . I just ask, will you join me?

May the Lord receive the reward for His suffering.

- Pilgrim



Jesus Our High Priest – Part 19

We are pleased to continue the Saturday Sermon Series again. This is the nineteenth in a series of twenty messages from John 17. It was sovereignly delivered by Akash Sant Singh, who is one of the elders at Community Bible Church in Reno, Nevada. May it bring conviction to each of us as we realize our deep lack of prayer, which should be elemental to our Christian faith. Sadly, our prayer lives tend to reveal more about our self-sufficiency than of our utter dependency on the Saviour of our souls.

Jesus Our High Priest – Part 19