Quotes (805)

http://easterpeople.wordpress.com/2009/07/23/im-a-charismatic-baptist-reformed-calvinist/

I am told that, years ago above the Falls of Niagra, a boat was upset, and two men were being carried down by the current. Persons on the shore managed to float a rope out to the men, who both seized the rope. One of them held fast to it and was safely drawn to the bank. But the other, seeing a great log come floating by, unwisely let go of the rope and clung to the great piece of timber, for it was the bigger thing of the two and apparently better to cling to. Alas, the timber with the man on it went right over the vast abyss, because there was no union between the wood and the shore. The size of the log was no benefit to him who grasped it. It needed a connection with the shore to produce safety. So, when a man trusts his works, his prayers, alms giving, sacraments, or anything of the sort, he will not be saved, because there is no connection between him and God through Christ Jesus. But faith, though it may seem to be a slender cord, is in the hand of the great God on the shore.

- Charles Spurgeon

1834 – 1892

4 thoughts on “Quotes (805)

  1. Brother K says:

    Wow! That’s an awesome quote and it immediately reminded me of something that I had heard from the pulpit when I was a member of one of Eddie Long’s satellite campuses. The speaker was mocking little storefront preachers as not being in line with God while extolling the virtues of the size of the church and the depths of the tithes and how “Bishop” Long was our spiritual father and we had access to all the godliness evident at the main campus and it’s runaway success because size + wealth = holiness. Well, a quick sprint through the Book of Acts is enough to slap down that nonsense, and I knew of a couple of storefront preachers where that church was the only one in their towns, but it is nice to see that initial balk I felt at the time illustrated so fully by Spurgeon.

  2. Parakletos says:

    This I think comes as one of the enemy’s subtlest temptations, yet it’s a grossly real one. It comes in many forms, and looks good many times, but each time the end is that you let go of that rope of life and grab that branch of destruction. I heard a story of John Knox that even on his deathbed, he was being hit with thoughts to trust on his own works, yet he kept shooting Scripture verses back at them.

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