11 Comments

Is the world crucified to you?

Just finished making a video to go along with one of the greatest quotes from Leonard Ravenhill–“Is the world crucified to you tonight? Or does it fascinate you?” To look at many churches across America–you know, the ones that serve that ooey-gooey sugary goodness that screams “seeker sensitive”–you would think that the apostle Paul was a laid-back, hippie-type slacker dude who didn’t care much about doctrine, but went around with “so what does this verse mean to you?” on his lips.

Anyhoo, many of the images in this video can be found over at A Little Leaven. And since someone will ask–the music is “Carmina Burana (O Fortuna)” by Carl Orff. It’s one of those pieces of music you hear on just about everything, but never knew what it was called. Well now you know :)

11 comments on “Is the world crucified to you?

  1. Well put together, even if it makes you wonder what the ‘church’ in America is supposed to represent.

    I’m in England, the same goes for over here and in other western nations.

    I don’t like to use the word Church loosely, since the Church is the body of Christ, Eph 1v24, so I do question if what we have in the west today, God recognises as the Church at all.

    If we can applaude the world, and embrace what it is doing, and bring it into our buildings that we use for the ‘church’ to meet, then we have to be enemies of God, James 4v4.

    To be crucified is to be dead. Therefore, the world should have no influence upon us whatsoever.

    If it does, well, question why.

    God bless.

  2. Doreen,

    You are right about the “church” in America. It is, for the most part, lukewarm at best and nearly dead at worst.

    As to your observation that, To be crucified is to be dead. Therefore, the world should have no influence upon us whatsoever. Unfortunately, many “churches” in America have reversed that paradigm. They are dead. Therefore they have no influence upon the world whatsoever.

  3. A bit about the music in the video, and the composer.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carl_orff

    “Orff is most known for Carmina Burana (1937), a “scenic cantata”. It is the first of a trilogy that also includes Catulli Carmina and Trionfo di Afrodite. Carmina Burana reflected his interest in medieval German poetry. Together the trilogy is called Trionfi, or “triumphs”. The composer described it as the celebration of the triumph of the human spirit through sexual and holistic balance.”

    Does it say anything that a video meant to show compromise does itself use music meant to be a “celebration of the triumph of the human spirit through sexual and holistic balance”.

  4. Thank you for the info! I did not know that. If I had, I certainly would not have used that music. Since this is the case, I will have to make a new video using different music.

  5. That’s fine, fourpointer. I’m not trying to be critical. I think the video does well in expressing the message.

    Perhaps there does need to be some kind of clarifying on where lines need to be in using some modern-day things. For example, I enjoy listening to the “Way of the Master” radio podcasts, but I do note that they use a lot of audio clips from tv and movies. That’s not a criticism, it’s an observation. I think they use them very effectively, more often then not.

  6. Okey-doke. You know, thinking about it, it does kinda fit, since this is a video about churches trying to find some kind of “gospel message” in the music of atheists and eastern mystics (e.g., the Beatles), and using the world’s methods to get people into their building.

  7. Curious take on it, and it may have its merits. But aren’t you then more-or-less doing what they are doing? Granted that Orff is substantially less popular then the Beatles, you now know some of what he was thinking when he wrote that work.

    Again, my point isn’t to criticize the use of Orff. It’s to get some idea of what may be the consistent and proper use of such a work. For example, is it ok to use it in an internet video, but not in a church service? But then, why and why not?

  8. There are ministries that produce videos about the effects and influence of rock music, rap, movies, etc. that use actual clips to point out how these “art forms” are blasphemous and of Satan. With these videos, one must actively obtain them and willfully watch/listen. The person can control who is present when they view it. I don’t really think it’s wrong to use the things of the world to point out those who look for some kind of “gospel message” in the music of the world, as long as one uses proper discretion.

    However, in a church service–for one thing it is God’s house, and we should not bring the things of the devil inside, even for purposes of demonstration. Also, when a family brings their children into a church service, they expect–obviously–a family environment, one free from the things of the world.

  9. Given the bend to the message (question) the music if fitting.

    Oh fortuna,
    Velat Luna,
    Statu variabilis

    Semper Crescis
    Aut Decrescis
    Vita detestabilis

    Nunc Obdurat
    Et tunc Curat
    Ludo mentis Aciem

    etc.
    Roughly translated
    Oh Fortuna/Goddess of luck
    like the moon ever changeing

    Always growing
    To decreasis
    detestable life (unsure about this line)

    Now inflicting
    Then healing
    (unsure about this line)

    If you then correlate this to the question:

    Is the world crucified to you or does it fascinate you?

    Then the music fits the fascinating images of the world, and their transient character.

  10. Excellent video! I was searching for the person who originated that quote (Is the world crucified to you tonight? Or does it fascinate you?), and found this post. Loved it!

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